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10 Classic Car Nameplates That Need to Make a Comeback

Times change. Nowhere is this more apparent now than in the automotive world, where cars have evolved more in the past decade than they had in the previous three. Autonomous driving systems, powerful small-displacement engines, and electric powertrains are changing the way we drive and think about cars with each passing month.

Still, nostalgia is a powerful thing. It’s no secret why Ford is bringing back the Bronco or why people are still spending their hard-earned money on Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers. These models have an air of the good old days without reminding us that, well, the good old days weren’t always that good.

That said, we think even in today’s changing automotive marketplace, there’s still room for some models that feed into our collective appetite for nostalgia. From confirmed models to rumors or just wishful thinking, here are 10 classic cars we think are due for a big comeback. Here’s hoping the automakers agree. 

1. Plymouth Barracuda

1970 Plymouth 'Cuda AAR

1970 Plymouth 'Cuda AAR 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda AAR | Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Released at the height of the muscle car arms race, the Barracuda (the hotter versions were simply called ‘Cuda) has become one of the most sought after American performance cars ever built. In 2015, Fiat Chrysler announced an all-new Barracuda would debut alongside the next-generation Challenger. But with that redesign delayed until at least 2020, it doesn’t look like we’ll see a 21st century ‘Cuda anytime soon either. That’s a shame. With the Mustang and Camaro getting better every year, the automaker could use some help in the muscle car department.

Next: We’d like to see Jeep go further than a Wrangler pickup. 

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