Home News At least 29 people have died in the Camp fire, making it...

At least 29 people have died in the Camp fire, making it the joint-deadliest blaze in California’s history

The death toll rose after five bodies were found inside houses in the burned-out town of Paradise, while another was discovered in a nearby car.

But 228 people are still unaccounted for after the town was engulfed by the flames, meaning that death toll could rise considerably.

Butte County Sheriff Cory Honea said the devastation is so complete in some neighborhoods that ‘it’s very difficult to determine whether or not there may be human remains there’.

‘In some cases, the only remains we are able to recover are bones or bone fragments,’ Honea said.

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At least 29 people have died in the Camp wildfire, making it the joint-deadliest in California's history alongside the Griffith Park fire which struck Los Angeles in 1933 (pictured, bodies are located in the town of Paradise)

The death toll rose on Sunday after the remains of five people were found inside houses in Paradise, while another was found in a nearby car (pictured, body bags are loaded into a hearse in Paradise) 

Butte County Sheriff Cory Honea revealed another 228 people are unaccounted for, adding that finding their remains is proving difficult, as many bodies have been reduced to little more than bone fragments 

Butte County Sheriff Cory Honea revealed another 228 people are unaccounted for, adding that finding their remains is proving difficult, as many bodies have been reduced to little more than bone fragments

Cathy Fallon (center), who lives in Paradise, stayed behind to tend to her horses during the Camp Fire. She survived, and was pictured embracing Shawna De Long (left) and April Smith who brought supplies for the horses

 One of the fire's victims was an ailing woman whose body was found in bed in a burned-out house in Concow, near Paradise. Ellen Walker, who was in her early 70s, was home alone when the fire struck on Thursday, according to Nancy Breeding, a family friend

Those living in Paradise were ordered to flee their homes as the fire closed in, but found themselves trapped on roads that were not designed to carry that weight of traffic (pictured, burned-out cars near the town)

Those living in Paradise were ordered to flee their homes as the fire closed in, but found themselves trapped on roads that were not designed to carry that weight of traffic (pictured, burned-out cars near the town)

Firefighters trying to get into Paradise to assess the extent of the devastation first had to clear the road of cars which got stuck in the flames and burned up

A car sits next to a trail of metal which was melted by the heat of the fire before solidifying again as the blaze moved away