Home TECH & SCIENCE How to watch the once-in-a-lifetime eclipse without burning your eyes out

How to watch the once-in-a-lifetime eclipse without burning your eyes out

Not in the path of totality? The internet has you covered.

The U.S. has gone eclipse mad. Tens of thousands of people are expected to flood to the areas across the country that are on the path of the totality on Monday, Aug. 21, to catch a once-in-a-lifetime few minutes when the moon passes in front of the sun.

This is one of the few eclipses that will only be seen in North America, and one of the few total solar eclipses that will only be seen within the continental U.S. The show starts at 1 pm ET / 10 am PT.

Here’s where the eclipse is passing over the U.S. and where you can get the best view just by stepping outside. You can check out this useful site to see exactly what you can expect to see from your location.

This NASA map of the United States shows the path of totality for the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse.NASA
This map of the United States shows the path of totality for the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse.

If you’re in the path of the total eclipse, that’s great, but if you’re someone who’s decided not to brave the traffic, the airfare and the desperate search on Airbnb for a last-minute room, then have no fear. Just about everyone in the U.S. will be able to view the eclipse from the safety of their home, or even from their smartphone while in line at the coffee shop.

It’s no surprise that NASA is providing wall-to-wall coverage. The government institution is providing video by “by 11 spacecraft, at least three NASA aircraft, more than 50 high-altitude balloons, and the astronauts aboard the International Space Station — each offering a unique vantage point for the celestial event.” So. Yeah.

Here are some of the easiest ways to watch online.

NASA will have a Facebook Live that you can watch below:

Or you can watch on NASA TV:

Of course there are NASA apps for iOS, Android and Amazon Fire and Fire TV that will be showing the eclipse.

Still not satisfied? Okay, NASA will be streaming it on Periscope, Twitch TV and Ustream.

If you’re feeling like getting a truly immersive experience, CNN is pulling a CNN and going all out by showing the eclipse in VR.

And while you won’t need special glasses to watch the eclipse online, in case you want to go outside to try and see it (please don’t with your bare eyes), NASA has a pro-tip video for how to do that safely. Spoiler: Use special glasses, people.


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