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Recode Daily: Yesterday, Trump said he’ll send up to 4,000 more troops to Afghanistan; tonight: A rally for himself in Arizona

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Plus, a digital media veteran takes over the LA Times, CNN launches a daily news show on Snap, and how do you follow totality?

President Trump returns tonight to a deeply divided Arizona for a nighttime rally with his core supporters in Phoenix. The state’s two senators, John McCain and Jeff Flake, are among Trump’s most vocal critics within the Republican Party. Last night, Trump gave a speech — his first nationally televised prime-time address since January — outlining a new strategy to carry on the nearly 16-year-old conflict in Afghanistan, which will likely call for the deployment of up to 4,000 more U.S. troops. [CNN.com]

Digital media veteran Ross Levinsohn is the new publisher and CEO of the Los Angeles Times. Levinsohn made his digital reputation by helping News Corp acquire Myspace in 2005, and he ran Yahoo for a stretch; this is his first newspaper. His appointment is part of the paper’s latest restructuring under management by the Tronc conglomerate, which also resulted in the firing of several top editors. [Peter Kafka / Recode]

In an effort to get more video in front of more young people, CNN launched a daily news show exclusively for Snapchat. NBC launched a twice-daily news show on Snapchat last month; CNN’s three-to-five-minute “The Update” will run every day at 6 p.m. Meanwhile, teens are leaving Facebook faster than expected, according to a new study — but lots of those teens are turning to Instagram, which Facebook owns. The study also predicts that Snapchat will be bigger than both Facebook and Instagram in the 12- to 17-year-old and 18- to 24-year-old categories by the end of the year. [Kurt Wagner / Recode]

Facebook has made a permanent page for Safety Check, its feature for letting others know that you’re safe during an emergency. The dedicated tab, which will roll out in the next few weeks, lists catastrophes and crises all over the world. [Jacob Kastrenakes / The Verge]

Smartphone “hijackings” are on the rise: In a growing number of online attacks, hackers are calling up carriers and asking them to transfer control of a victim’s mobile phone number to a device under the control of the hackers; they can then reset the passwords on every account that uses the phone number as a security backup. [Nathaniel Popper / The New York Times]

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